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5 Fun Facts About Mule Deer

5 Fun Facts About Mule Deer

Wildlife
You know Dasher and Dancer and Prancer and Vixen, but do you recall your local mule deer at all? In this winter wildlife blog series, we’ll be exploring some fun facts about the wildlife that live in our watershed and how they adapt to winter conditions. We’re kicking things off with 5 fun facts about Rudolph’s local cousin, the mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus). Courtesy Kelsey Fitzgerald, Truckee River Guide #1: They have really big ears! Mule deer may not have Rudolph’s red nose, but they do have an equally distinct characteristic - their big ears, which is why they’re called “mule” deer. They also have a black-tipped tail, which makes them easy to distinguish from whitetail deer. #2: Their antlers can grow up to ¼” per day. Just like reindeer,…
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Some of Truckee Meadows Regional Efforts to Address Homelessness and Lack of Affordable Housing in 2018/19

Some of Truckee Meadows Regional Efforts to Address Homelessness and Lack of Affordable Housing in 2018/19

Efforts
A compilation of regional updates provided by One Truckee River's Partnership Coordinator, Iris, and the 2018 Housing and Sanitation Working Group: Northern Nevada Adult Mental Health Services (NNAMHS) Campus: Washoe County is working to develop the NNAMHS Campus to serve 200+ currently homeless women, children, families, elderly, and pregnant women. If successful, this will open up space at the Volunteers of America (VOA) shelter for currently homeless men. The county anticipates opening this facility in the summer of 2019. The image to the left was part of a larger presentation (linked here) given to the Washoe County Commissioners on October 9, 2018 by Amber Howell, Washoe County Director of Social Services.  Case Managers: Washoe County currently supports three case managers in the region, and hopes to add six more for a total of nine case managers in the region. The county pays each collaborative agency $80,000 per case manager. The county is working to secure $480,000 within the current fiscal year to add six more case managers by June 2019.   Community Housing Land Trust: In…
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Election Day: Share Your Voice

Election Day: Share Your Voice

Around the Country, Efforts
November 6 is an important day this year. As many radio, TV, and social media ads may have told you, the 2018 election is taking place. Regardless of your race, gender, education level, job, etc., it is an incredible opportunity to cast your vote based on who/what you believe to be correct and fair. We encourage you to look up your voting location here and cast your vote on Election Day! Where We Stand: One Truckee River is a partnership made up of over 130 stakeholders banding together to protect, celebrate and promote the Truckee River. Our stakeholders are representatives of local businesses, agencies, organizations or private citizens, and there are many varying opinions among them. One thing our stakeholders agree on, however, is our One Truckee River Management Plan.…
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All About Pyramid Lake

All About Pyramid Lake

River History, Truckee River Watershed
Northern Nevada is known for many things: the nice people; its proximity to Lake Tahoe; the small-town feel in a growing city. The Truckee River flowing through Reno and Sparks is often a pleasant surprise to visitors (and some residents!). Even more unknown than the river, however, is what lies at its end: Pyramid Lake. [caption id="attachment_3925" align="alignleft" width="500"] Photo courtesy Flickr user Ron Reiring. Pyramid Lake in 2008 looking southeast.[/caption] The Truckee River flows out of Lake Tahoe and, after 121 miles of mountains, Reno/Sparks, and the desert, enters Pyramid Lake at its southern end. Pyramid Lake sits entirely within the Pyramid Lake Paiute Tribe Reservation, and is one of the tribe's most valuable assets. Pyramid Lake was mapped and named by the same fellow who first mapped the Truckee…
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OTR AmeriCorps: A New Generation

OTR AmeriCorps: A New Generation

Staff
We've got some new AmeriCorps here for One Truckee River! Meet Carrie Jensen and Sophie Butler, the latest n' greatest in a history of brilliant OTR AmeriCorps. We're excited to work with this duo over the next 11 months to make One Truckee River better than ever! Sophie Butler Having just completed her bachelor’s degree in Environmental Science with a concentration in Environmental Systems and Society at UCLA, Sophie is excited to share her enthusiasm for environmental preservation and sustainability with her new community. Sophie’s move to Reno was driven by her fondness of the Sierra Nevada Mountains, where her family would spend their weekends skiing throughout her adolescence in Sacramento, California. It was these passions, along with her desire to be involved with non-profit organizations, that brought her to…
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Flume, from Farad to Floriston

Flume, from Farad to Floriston

River History
There is a ton of history through the Truckee Canyon. Driving along I-80 in either direction, there are various old buildings and structures that may catch your eye. One of those eye-catching structures is the old Farad Hyrdoelectric Power Plant, built in 1899 by the Truckee River General Electric Company to help power silver mines in the area. The plant ran until 1997 (nearly 100 years) until a flood ended all operations. [caption id="attachment_3843" align="alignleft" width="800"] Farad Hydroelectric Power Plant as it is today (2018). Photo by Alex Hoeft[/caption] Originally, water from the Truckee River entered a flume upriver from Farad at Floriston. The diverted water flowed from Floriston to the plant and powered the turbines within the plant's powerhouse. The turbines generated electricity from there. Access to the power…
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Truckee River Master Signage Plan

Truckee River Master Signage Plan

Efforts, One River
If you've spent time along the Truckee River, there are many things that might have caught your attention: the sound of water as it flows past; the birds chirping from the trees; the groups of people floating by on their inflatable tubes. And the hundreds of signs. The Truckee River is absolutely one of Northern Nevada's crown jewels. Not only does it supply us with a heavy majority of our region's drinking water, it's also a source of nature and recreation running through the middle of our home. Of course, we want to share information about the river -- safety tips, distance markers, educational information, etc. But all of this information has yielded a ton of signs in our parks and along the river walkways. Some signs are big, others…
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Truckee River Watershed: Mogul Creek

Truckee River Watershed: Mogul Creek

One River, Truckee River Watershed
Similar to Chalk Creek, Mogul Creek is a minor tributary flowing down from Peavine Mountain into the Truckee River. Mogul Creek flows south through the Peavine foothills between residential developments, past Somersett Park - East, around a few golf holes of the Somersett Country Club, and down through a small valley before reaching more houses, slipping under I-80 and plopping into the Truckee River. [gallery grids="News" image_size="large" ids="3056,3057,3058"] Mogul Creek's lower reach is in a concrete-lined channel just west of River Christian Center. The creek enters the Truckee River on private property. As stated in our Chalk Creek post, the Mogul and Chalk creeks sit on the Hunter Creek Sandstone Formation -- a geologic formation containing high amounts of salts in the soil. Before major population growth in the area,…
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Truckee River Watershed: Alum Creek

Truckee River Watershed: Alum Creek

One River, Truckee River Watershed
Alum Creek is an extremely pretty creek to follow if you're in the mood for a walk. The creek flows through west Reno through the Caughlin Ranch area and enters the Truckee River just west of Crissie Caughlin Park. A footpath can be found next to a majority of the creek, and thanks to Steamboat Ditch flows diverting into Alum Creek at five different points, the creek flows almost year-round. The greenbelt on Caughlin Parkway just west of the Plumb/McCarran intersection has multiple ponds to wander around. [caption id="attachment_3027" align="aligncenter" width="525"] Icy pond within the greenbelt off Caughlin Parkway.[/caption] As the City of Reno states it in a Truckee River Watershed guide, there are opportunities for revegetation along Alum Creek, particularly right before entering the Truckee River (pictured below). [caption…
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Truckee River Watershed: North Evans Creek

Truckee River Watershed: North Evans Creek

One River, Truckee River Watershed
North Evans Creek is the creek that you might not realize you're seeing if you've wandered around Rancho San Rafael Park in Reno. Flowing south from the Panther Valley area, this creek flows along North Virginia Street before entering Rancho. North Evans Creek follows Evans Canyon Trail from Vista Rafael Way to the Nature Trail in the northern portion of Rancho, and under North McCarran Blvd. Once the creek passes McCarran, rock weirs capture the flows to create a wetland. More on the wetland from the City of Reno's watershed map: "This wetland was constructed to manage the higher flows coming down Evans Creek (in lieu of building a dam just above the Nature Trail across McCarran), allow pollution to settle out in the flat areas, and reduce flooding of Sierra…
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