Seven Ways to Finish Your Summer Off Right

Seven Ways to Finish Your Summer Off Right

Recreation, Truckee River Watershed, Wildlife
July is over halfway over, meaning there's less than one month before school starts again and the memories of late nights and lake days will be simply that -- memories. We did the hard work of finding ways to finish the summer off perfectly. These opportunities will inspire more time in nature, and hopefully a more intimate love of the Truckee River and its benefits. Start checking off your bucket list today! 1. Build a Trail We hike enough of the trails in our area, but have you ever thought about building one? Talk about a gift that keeps on giving. There are plenty of local groups that could use a pair of eager hands when it comes to combing through natural landscapes. Give it a go at the July…
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River-Friendly Landscaping Part 5: Firescaping

River-Friendly Landscaping Part 5: Firescaping

River-Friendly Landscaping, Truckee River Watershed, Water Quality, Wildlife
The summer weather is heating up, and we’ve already had several Red Flag Warnings and small brush fires. It’s officially wildfire season in Northern Nevada! Chuck Grimmett/  Flickr Want to breathe easy knowing you and your yard are prepared? In this, the fifth of our River-Friendly Landscaping series, we’ll cover how Firescaping your yard can play an important role in promoting a healthy watershed while protecting your home from fire. But before we dive into the details of Firescaping , let’s discuss the effects fire can have on our watershed. While we’re all acutely aware of the social and economic impacts when people lose homes and are displaced by wildfire, there are also long-term environmental impacts that affect watersheds that don’t get as much media attention.  Water Quality Ecologist Chris…
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River-Friendly Landscaping Part 4: Creating Wildlife Habitat

River-Friendly Landscaping Part 4: Creating Wildlife Habitat

River-Friendly Landscaping, Wildlife
Lions and tigers and bears - oh my! Although this may be what comes to mind when thinking of creating wildlife habitat, for obvious reasons we don’t want to attract big wildlife like black bears and mountain lions into our yards. But that doesn’t mean we can’t make room for some smaller wildlife, like beneficial insects. There’s plenty of room in your yard to share with these little guys. And, did you know that it’s National Pollinator Week? So for this, the fourth in our River-Friendly Landscaping Series, we’re talking pollinators! Why are pollinators important? Well, firstly because pollinators help feed us! Many of the foods you eat every day are made possible because of the hard work of pollinators  - avocados, blueberries, tomatoes, chocolate, and bananas, just to name…
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Wildlife in the Parks

Wildlife in the Parks

Conservation, Efforts, One River, Wildlife
This post was shared with permission from the Truckee Meadows Parks Foundation. The original post can be found here.Written by Ellen Wilson, Education Coordinator VISTA Imagine yourself walking along a trail in one of Reno’s many parks, on a warm and sunny day. You spot a beautiful red-tailed hawk take a quick dive at a vole, and fly back up into a tree with its prize in its talons. You walk a little farther and spot a Western fence lizard scurry up a log, and you catch a glimpse of its bright blue belly. In the distance, you see three coyotes running, and they stop and turn to look at you. Wildlife in our parks is common, and can be very exciting for us to run into. When I see an…
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Dam It All: the Beaver’s DIY Guide to Winter Survival

Dam It All: the Beaver’s DIY Guide to Winter Survival

Wildlife
Dam, dam, dam! via GIPHY This is the mantra that fills a beaver’s mind when the autumn air starts to chill and the days start to shorten. For the beaver’s adaptation to winter, survival is not, like most, to hibernate or migrate. No, the industrious beaver’s solution is to engineer the ultimate winter shelter and, you guessed it, it involves a dam. In this, the third of our winter wildlife series, we bring you the beaver’s DIY guide to winter survival in 5 easy steps. Step 1: Buy the necessary tools Well, if you’re a beaver, you can skip this step. Lucky for them, they are born with all the tools necessary to build the ultimate winter shelter - their bare hands and their teeth! Beavers' paws are especially adapted…
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New Year’s Party Quiz: Test Your Hibernation Savvy

New Year’s Party Quiz: Test Your Hibernation Savvy

Wildlife
How do wildlife celebrate the New Years? Well, it goes something like this….10, 9, 8, 7, 6, 5, 4, 3, 2, 1, zzzzzzz. Yes, that’s right - they’re sleeping! Hibernating Fox by Carrie Jensen When it comes to the New Year, we humans have a rather strange way of celebrating. We go out in the freezing cold, party horns in one hand and libations in the other, to wait for a huge ball to drop out of the sky and announce midnight with a big bang and fireworks; meanwhile, the rest of the natural world is hiding away inside cozy dens hibernating and waiting for a more sensible time to celebrate - spring! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F9FXdLcrkss In this, the second of our winter wildlife series, we will be exploring the wonders of…
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5 Fun Facts About Mule Deer

5 Fun Facts About Mule Deer

Wildlife
You know Dasher and Dancer and Prancer and Vixen, but do you recall your local mule deer at all? In this winter wildlife blog series, we’ll be exploring some fun facts about the wildlife that live in our watershed and how they adapt to winter conditions. We’re kicking things off with 5 fun facts about Rudolph’s local cousin, the mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus). Courtesy Kelsey Fitzgerald, Truckee River Guide #1: They have really big ears! Mule deer may not have Rudolph’s red nose, but they do have an equally distinct characteristic - their big ears, which is why they’re called “mule” deer. They also have a black-tipped tail, which makes them easy to distinguish from whitetail deer. #2: Their antlers can grow up to ¼” per day. Just like reindeer,…
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