OTR AmeriCorps: A New Generation

OTR AmeriCorps: A New Generation

Staff
We've got some new AmeriCorps here for One Truckee River! Meet Carrie Jensen and Sophie Butler, the latest n' greatest in a history of brilliant OTR AmeriCorps. We're excited to work with this duo over the next 11 months to make One Truckee River better than ever! Sophie Butler Having just completed her bachelor’s degree in Environmental Science with a concentration in Environmental Systems and Society at UCLA, Sophie is excited to share her enthusiasm for environmental preservation and sustainability with her new community. Sophie’s move to Reno was driven by her fondness of the Sierra Nevada Mountains, where her family would spend their weekends skiing throughout her adolescence in Sacramento, California. It was these passions, along with her desire to be involved with non-profit organizations, that brought her to…
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Flume, from Farad to Floriston

Flume, from Farad to Floriston

River History
There is a ton of history through the Truckee Canyon. Driving along I-80 in either direction, there are various old buildings and structures that may catch your eye. One of those eye-catching structures is the old Farad Hyrdoelectric Power Plant, built in 1899 by the Truckee River General Electric Company to help power silver mines in the area. The plant ran until 1997 (nearly 100 years) until a flood ended all operations. [caption id="attachment_3843" align="alignleft" width="800"] Farad Hydroelectric Power Plant as it is today (2018). Photo by Alex Hoeft[/caption] Originally, water from the Truckee River entered a flume upriver from Farad at Floriston. The diverted water flowed from Floriston to the plant and powered the turbines within the plant's powerhouse. The turbines generated electricity from there. Access to the power…
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Truckee River Master Signage Plan

Truckee River Master Signage Plan

Efforts, One River
If you've spent time along the Truckee River, there are many things that might have caught your attention: the sound of water as it flows past; the birds chirping from the trees; the groups of people floating by on their inflatable tubes. And the hundreds of signs. The Truckee River is absolutely one of Northern Nevada's crown jewels. Not only does it supply us with a heavy majority of our region's drinking water, it's also a source of nature and recreation running through the middle of our home. Of course, we want to share information about the river -- safety tips, distance markers, educational information, etc. But all of this information has yielded a ton of signs in our parks and along the river walkways. Some signs are big, others…
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Truckee River Watershed: Mogul Creek

Truckee River Watershed: Mogul Creek

One River, Truckee River Watershed
Similar to Chalk Creek, Mogul Creek is a minor tributary flowing down from Peavine Mountain into the Truckee River. Mogul Creek flows south through the Peavine foothills between residential developments, past Somersett Park - East, around a few golf holes of the Somersett Country Club, and down through a small valley before reaching more houses, slipping under I-80 and plopping into the Truckee River. [gallery grids="News" image_size="large" ids="3056,3057,3058"] Mogul Creek's lower reach is in a concrete-lined channel just west of River Christian Center. The creek enters the Truckee River on private property. As stated in our Chalk Creek post, the Mogul and Chalk creeks sit on the Hunter Creek Sandstone Formation -- a geologic formation containing high amounts of salts in the soil. Before major population growth in the area,…
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Truckee River Watershed: Alum Creek

Truckee River Watershed: Alum Creek

One River, Truckee River Watershed
Alum Creek is an extremely pretty creek to follow if you're in the mood for a walk. The creek flows through west Reno through the Caughlin Ranch area and enters the Truckee River just west of Crissie Caughlin Park. A footpath can be found next to a majority of the creek, and thanks to Steamboat Ditch flows diverting into Alum Creek at five different points, the creek flows almost year-round. The greenbelt on Caughlin Parkway just west of the Plumb/McCarran intersection has multiple ponds to wander around. [caption id="attachment_3027" align="aligncenter" width="525"] Icy pond within the greenbelt off Caughlin Parkway.[/caption] As the City of Reno states it in a Truckee River Watershed guide, there are opportunities for revegetation along Alum Creek, particularly right before entering the Truckee River (pictured below). [caption…
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Truckee River Watershed: North Evans Creek

Truckee River Watershed: North Evans Creek

One River, Truckee River Watershed
North Evans Creek is the creek that you might not realize you're seeing if you've wandered around Rancho San Rafael Park in Reno. Flowing south from the Panther Valley area, this creek flows along North Virginia Street before entering Rancho. North Evans Creek follows Evans Canyon Trail from Vista Rafael Way to the Nature Trail in the northern portion of Rancho, and under North McCarran Blvd. Once the creek passes McCarran, rock weirs capture the flows to create a wetland. More on the wetland from the City of Reno's watershed map: "This wetland was constructed to manage the higher flows coming down Evans Creek (in lieu of building a dam just above the Nature Trail across McCarran), allow pollution to settle out in the flat areas, and reduce flooding of Sierra…
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Truckee River Watershed: Chalk Creek

Truckee River Watershed: Chalk Creek

One River, Truckee River Watershed
Sitting up in Northwest Reno is Chalk Creek -- one of multiple tributaries trickling down from Peavine Mountain and the surrounding hills into the Truckee River. Prior to urbanization in the area, Chalk Creek flowed only in response to storm events. Once residential and commercial buildings began to appear, the lower parts of Chalk Creek began to flow year-round. [caption id="attachment_2883" align="aligncenter" width="525"] Taken off Crown View Drive. Here, Chalk Creek is flowing in a low valley between residential neighborhoods. Just around the hill on the left side of the picture the creek will pass under I-80.[/caption] The creek flows alongside many parks and walking trails in Northwest Reno; along Robb Drive, past McQueen High School, through residential neighborhoods, by Rainbow Ridge Park and through a valley, under I-80 and…
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Truckee River Watershed: Dog Creek and Sunrise Creek

Truckee River Watershed: Dog Creek and Sunrise Creek

One River, Truckee River Watershed
We lumped Dog Creek and Sunrise Creek together due to size and location -- basically, Sunrise Creek is teensy and it's right next to Dog Creek. Dog Creek and Sunrise Creek sit up in Verdi, flowing down from the east-facing mountains between Stampede Reservoir and Verdi and into the Truckee River. Dog Creek passes through Dog Valley, a beautiful spot in the Humboldt-Toiyabe National Forest made up forests, streams and meadows. Once Dog Creek enters Nevada, it pretty quickly empties into the Truckee River. [caption id="attachment_2831" align="aligncenter" width="525"] Dog Creek emptying into the Truckee River. Photo taken from the Crystal Park Bridge in Verdi.[/caption] According to the Forest Service, "Dog Valley is... home to two rare plant species, Dog Valley ivesia and Webber’s ivesia. Dog Valley ivesia can only be found…
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Truckee River Watershed: Dry Creek

Truckee River Watershed: Dry Creek

One River, Truckee River Watershed
We promise we won't make any cliche jokes about how Dry Creek isn't very dry right now.......... Dry Creek is a tributary of the Truckee River that starts in the Southwest Reno area (Lakeside/Holcomb Ranch), shimmies northeasterly past the airport and into Boynton Slough, where it joins Steamboat Creek on its road to the Truckee River. Below are shots of Boynton Slough, which is fed by Dry Creek. [gallery grids="News" image_size="large" ids="2812,2810,2809"] (Thank you to the Canada geese for modeling for us.) The following plants, among others, are common along Dry Creek: Incense cedar, Jeffrey Pine, red and white fir, Pinyon pine, juniper, willows, Native rose, Russian olive, elm, and cattails. Wildlife found is similar across the entire watershed, and includes:  black bear, bobcat, red fox, rattlesnake, bald eagle, golden eagle,…
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Truckee River Watershed: South Evans Creek

Truckee River Watershed: South Evans Creek

One River, Truckee River Watershed
On the Friday before Christmas, we headed to South Evans Creek to do some 'sploring. South Evans Creek drains from the foothills on the western edge of Reno. The headwaters emerge from alpine springs in vast meadows surrounded by dry forests, and trickle down canyons, through residential developments, through Bartley Ranch Park and into Dry Creek and Boynton Slough, where the water eventually ends up in the Truckee River. In the upper South Evans Creek watershed, common plant-life includes Incense cedar, Sugar pine, red and white fir, Tobacco bush, rushes, sedges, lupine, phlox, and Arrowleaf balsamroot. Down in the lower part of the creek, you'll find Desert peach, Mormon tea, dogwood, Russian olive, broom snakeweed, Indian paintbrush, cattail, Medusa head grass, tansy mustard, and clover. Wildlife found is similar across the…
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